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How much does it cost to get an electric charger installed at home?

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How much is a home charger for an electric car?

A home charge point typically costs between £800 to £1,500. This price depends on which home charger installer you choose and the choice of charge model you opt for.

In April 2022 the Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) which provided grants for home charger installation closed. However, the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles has announced that a similar scheme is available for people that live in flats or currently rent their home. Just like the previous scheme, the Government will contribute up to £350 of the cost for one chargepoint and its installation.

In a further stipulation, OZEV states that a qualifying electric vehicle must also have dedicated off-street parking at their property.

Therefore, if you qualify for the new grant this will significantly bring the cost down.

How much power does an electric car charger use?

The power used by EVs is measured in kilowatts, which is the same unit your electricity is measured in. Electric car batteries have a capacity which typically ranges from around 17 kWh (kilowatt hours), like you’ll see in the Smart ForTwo EQ, all the way up to 100kWh and beyond, as with the Tesla Model S Ludicrous Performance.

To work out how long it takes to charge an EV from zero to 100%, all you have to do is divide the battery capacity by the speed of charging. Home charge points typically offer speeds of 7kW, although it’s possible to get slower and faster ones. This gives you the amount of power a full charge consumes.

To work out the cost of a full charge, all you have to do is multiply how much you pay for electricity by the capacity of your car’s battery. Plenty of energy companies offer tariffs aimed at EV drivers which cost just 5p per kW at off-peak times, while more and more are able to deliver renewable energy to your home.

To give you an idea of how long and how much it costs to charge different electric cars, we’ve put together a handy table below, and although EV friendly tariffs can offer 5p per kW energy rates we’ve based the information below on a more average electricity cost of 14p per kW :

Vehicle

Battery size

Full charge time

Cost of full charge

Real world range

Hyundai Ioniq

38kWh

5 hours 26 mins

£5.32

165 miles

Nissan e-NV200

40kWh

5 hours 43 mins

£5.60

130 miles

Kia E-Niro

64kWh

9 hours 9 mins

£8.96

235 miles

Mercedes EQC

80kWh

11 hours 26 mins

£11.20

230 miles

Tesla Model S

100kWh

14 hours 17 mins

£14.00

315 miles

*cost of full charge based on an energy price of 14p per kW

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Can I charge my car through a regular plug socket?

It is possible to charge an EV by using a regular 3-pin plug, and most new vehicles will come with a cable for you to do this. It’s best to keep this option as a back-up though, rather than as your main method of charging.

This is because charging your car like this is slow at 2.3kW and puts strain on a regular electric circuit, as it runs close to its 3kW maximum for a long time. For example, it’ll take more than 17 hours to fully charge a 40kWh battery like the one in the popular Nissan Leaf. A 64kWh Kia E-Niro, meanwhile, will take almost 28 hours to charge from empty to full.

How to get electric car charger at home

Arranging installation of a home charger is easy, and you can do it through either your energy provider or a specialist company. You can use Zap Map to find a charge point installer near you by entering your postcode and the brand of charger you’d like. If you lease an electric car with us, this is something we can help you arrange.

What’s the best home charger to get?

Home charge points are available in 3kW and 7kW forms, but 7kW chargers are most common. They come in a lot of different styles, whether you’re after a futuristic design to be a feature of your driveway, or a small, subtle covering to hide your charge point inside something like a wood-effect box.

There are plenty of different brands you can choose between, while you should look out for the type of connector your car has and the features on offer with different chargers, such as compatibility with apps and other energy-saving devices in your home. You can also choose between different cable lengths to suit your needs, while companies like ChargePoint also offer 24/7 support.

What is a smart charger?

The UK government is looking to introduce regulations which ensure all EV charge points sold or installed in the country have smart charging functionality, while only smart chargers qualify for the government contribution towards installation of a home charge point.

They allow you to charge up at times of the day when the demand for energy is low, meaning there’s less strain on the electricity grid. You can program your charger to come on overnight to take advantage of the lower energy prices you get on your tariff, while their safe, fast and easy nature makes them win-win all round.

What is Vehicle-to-Grid charging?

Vehicle-to-Grid, or V2G charging is where electric cars effectively act as power banks, returning energy to the electricity grid during peak times. Whereas smart charging helps the grid by managing the demand placed on it, V2G technology goes a step further by taking energy from car batteries to power both your home and the country’s electricity network.

The concept is almost like having a huge decentralised power station across the UK. This will rely on renewable energy where cars are charged by a supplier offering it, while your car will still be fully charged when you need it to be. V2G technology is improving all the time and will become more accessible over the coming years.

Collecting data from a range of energy suppliers on how people charge up is crucial to development. Electric Nation has recently launched a large V2G trial across the Midlands, South West and South Wales, offering Nissan EV drivers free installation of smart chargers worth £5,500 for the duration of the project. These can be kept at the end of the trial for just £250, so it could be a great idea to sign up for the trial if you meet the criteria.

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